Search Results for: Freelance

FREELANCE Interview on Newsarama

freelance-newsarama

Read on to discover what Andrew Wheeler, Vaneda Vireak, and I have planned for the new version of FREELANCE, one of Canada’s oldest original comic book heroes. The first issue arrives in January. Pre-order now!

FREELANCE Arrives in January!

freelance-1-cvr-a-perkins

In January Andrew Wheeler, Vaneda Vireak, and I are bringing back one of Canada’s oldest original comic heroes – Freelance!

Chapterhouse Comics is expanding their publishing line with the Chapterverse, a line of comics that work on their own as complete stories but also expand the shared setting from Captain Canuck.

Freelance is a globe-trotting action-packed adventure story set in the modern world but delivered with a pulpy flare. Andrew and I have been developing the characters and their story for several months now and we’re pumped for readers to see what we have in store. Below is a link to our first interview about the series and the order solicitation info:

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FREELANCE #1
The CHAPTERVERSE launches with this brand new series!

Lance Valiant, John Cabot, and Tasha Kolchak are fearless explorers who delve into hidden secrets of our world and protect us from threats beyond imagination, but the greatest secret of all may be Lance’s own mysterious past…

Pulse-pounding action, wit, intrigue, and globe-trotting romance – One of Canada’s original heroes is reborn for the Chapterhouse era by writers Andrew Wheeler (Another Castle) and Jim Zub (Thunderbolts), and artist Vineda Vireak (51Hundred)!

Cover A – Alex Perkins | Cover B – Blank Sketch
Written by Jim Zub & Andrew Wheeler | Illustrated by Vaneda Vireak |
32 pages, 6.25/10.18 | Full Color | $3.99
Diamond Order# Cover A: NOV161365 | Cover B: NOV161365

Making Comics – Creative Careers Are a Marathon

In this video, I talk about juggling freelance projects with a day job and the amount of time it took for me to get momentum as a comic writer.

These creative careers are a marathon, not a sprint.

How Skullkickers Began


Creativity is rarely a singular creator with an instantaneous idea. Concepts grow and change over time and, when new collaborators get brought into the mix, projects continue to evolve from initial idea hopefully through to finished work that gets released to great acclaim and fanfare.

It’s the 10th Anniversary of Skullkickers #1, the action-comedy sword & sorcery comic series that propelled my comic writing career forward in a big way. When I’m interviewed about the series I usually summarize it as “my love letter to Dungeons & Dragons and Conan the Barbarian” because that’s what it is for me, but I’m not the sole creator of Skullkickers.

So, here on our anniversary, I thought it would be appropriate to break down the timeline on how the series started and give extra context to the strange and winding road of a creative project. This is how real collaboration happens, how things change, and the way small decisions cause big adjustments later on.


Chris Stevens was a freelance artist doing work at the UDON studio and I worked at the studio as a Project Manager, soliciting work from a variety of clients and organizing art teams who delivered all kinds of different ad work, illustration, design and comic artwork. Chris and I got along quite well and, as a way to get him extra commission work between projects, I helped get him set up a DeviantArt page to show off his incredible work. Some of those pieces I posted up caught the eye of Joe Keatinge, who was working at Image Comics and co-editing an anthology series Image was putting out called Popgun and, in September of 2007, he offered Chris a spot in Popgun Volume 2.

Chris assumed Joe would pair him with a writer, but then he was told he could do whatever he wanted and emailed me about it to ask if I had any ideas for a story-

September 21, 2007:
Genre….well, I’d have to say fantasy is the way to go. You’d think I might be sick of it, but to be honest, it’s the most flexible genre to use and I’ve become a fan. I’ve got dick for ideas at the moment, but since it’s gonna be so short, the idea’s probably going to be the hardest part. I’ve tossed around a few ideas in my head but can’t seem to focus at the moment

It’s kinda tough to think of something. I mean, it’s really short and there’s no real rules. Not much to grab onto is there? Well, think about it when you can and let me know if you get any ideas.


I asked Chris about how things went from there-

“I was reluctant as usual, but you talked me into it and we started talking about what I’d be interested in doing. I decided on a D&D style high fantasy setting. I did this because I knew it would be fun and flexible and it was a setting I was familiar with through all of my UDON work.

I decided on a big human with a gun and a dwarf who were scumbags. People of low morality and character but still somehow likable. I chose that because I was loving Eric Powell’s The Goon and thought it would be fun to do a different take on the shady duo idea and I liked the visual of a big guy teaming with a small one. I also liked the idea of a guy with a firearm in a setting that doesn’t usually have guns. I designed them and gave them their weapons and armor. You were great and ran with all of my suggestions and since I’d never written before, I was grateful to have you take those criteria and create a first short story from that.”


October 5, 2007:
Chris sent the first sketch design of this duo while I organized the story.

Here’s how I responded to it-

The sketch looks pretty damn sweet, Chris. Probably my only suggestion is possibly to exaggerate their features a bit. Since we’re going for over the top violent it will probably work better if it’s a bit more Madureira than Charest, if you know what I mean. Imagine these characters up to their waists in zombies and entrail goo – YUM.


October 8, 2007:

From Chris-
Couple more sketches of our duo. Definitely a good call on the more exaggeration. I’m liking the vibe they have a lot more already and it fits a lot better. Didn’t make too many changes, but some things are a bit different. Mostly on our dwarf.

October 10, 2007:
Here’s my original outline for the story-

2 Copper Pieces
No Magic. No Problem

Story by Jim Zubkavich
Art by Chris Stevens

Pitch:
In a backwater fantasy world filled with all manners of magical beasts, poverty, disease and other horrifying threats, it’s a daily struggle to survive. Most people keep their head low, stay in the village they were born and eke out a life as a farmer or simple tradesperson. The only people strong enough to have anything else are protected by sorcerous powers or in the employ of the demonic.

Except for our two protagonists – They thrive by being stubborn and tough as Hell.

No one knows where this human and dwarf came from or how they’ve survived so long without using a speck of magic. They travel the land slaying every kind of beast in their path with sheer physical grit and vicious trickery. They’re not heroic or even nice – in fact they might be two of the most irritating and ornery assholes to ever heft a blade. No matter how obnoxious they may be, no one can argue with their results and the huge trail of corpses left in their wake. In world of the weak, they’re fighters.

Some folks despise them, others praise or even worship them – they don’t care.
They’d kill anything for 2 copper pieces.

Overview:
2 Copper Pieces is a fantasy parody on steroids. It revels in the clichés of sword and sorcery while injecting them with an extra spark of sass and violence. It’s not deep and meaningful by any stretch, instead keeping the reader engaged with snappy dialogue and inventive use of monsters. Like Ash from Army of Darkness, our “heroes” are so full of themselves and capable that you like them, even when they’re being absolute jerks.

Anthology Story:
The Popgun Anthology story would be a short 8-10 page quest by our protagonists, dropping readers into the middle of their world and a “typical” day for our deadly duo. We follow along as they hunt down a gigantic zombified worm that decimated a village near a boggy marsh. Even against the massive monster, our pair buckles down and gets to work using its own size and weight against it as they out maneuver it and stab deeply time and time again.

Just as our heroes think they’ve finished it off and carved the big worm open, they’re confronted by something even worse – the now exposed decaying remains inside the beast have been marinated in zombie stomach goo and are now a rampaging army of corpse parts lurching towards them. The duo shrug and prepare to wade in to the fray, confident they’ll emerge triumphant no matter what.


Chris liked it and Joe approved the pitch.

October 19, 2007:
Chris sent a design sketch of the worm.

Over the next three and a half months, Chris would digitally paint up the 10-page anthology story in between his other freelance projects and the holidays. Marshall Dillon lettered the story and we handed in the finished files in late January.

The response from Joe and the rest of the Popgun team was really strong.

February 4, 2008:
Erik Larsen, Publisher at Image Comics at that time, reached out with praise for the artwork:


Joe fired over some of your pages and I was pretty much floored by what I saw! You’ve got some serious chops, fellow. I dunno how fast you are or how versatile you are but I think you have some real promise and I’d like to help line you up with some work once you’ve wrapped up your Popgun yarn. Is there a website where I can see some more of your stuff?

Joe asked if we wanted to do more for Popgun Volume 3, which was already in development even before Volume 2 arrived in stores. I was excited to do another story with the boys from 2 Copper Pieces, but Chris was worried about the amount of time it would take.

April 11, 2008:
I sent Chris a concept for a 3-page story called ‘Gotcha’, a short interlude with our 2 Copper Pieces boys and Chris illustrated it over the next four weeks.

April 18, 2008:
I attended New York Comic Con (which ran from April 18-20 that year) and chatted with Erik Larsen. He asked if we were interested in pitching 2 Copper Pieces as an Image series.


May 13, 2008:
I email Joe and Erik an update on our progress-

Chris has been on a tear after wrapping up that second short story for Popgun v3. We’re going to put together a full comic proposal for Image built off of the “2 Copper Pieces” characters, having them storm their way through fantasy scenarios with violence and verve. After talking with Erik at New York Comic Con about it, he mentioned that the title should be catchier, so we’ve also got a few new title ideas that we think convey the concept in a catchy way:

Scumbags (Simple and straight to the point. Having this in a flowing calligraphy font for the title would have some amusing contrast to it)
Less Than Legendary (Also quite descriptive)
Never Legendary (Similar Concept)
Good Samaritans (Which, of course, they are anything but)
Dwarf & Baldy (a bit like Sam & Twitch)


May 14, 2008
Email back from Joe:
I don’t like any of those titles, including “Dwarf & Baldy”. I don’t see the Sam & Twitch connection.

Think more along the lines of BATTLE CHASERS. Something exciting, dramatic, that is still fantasy oriented. Good Samaritans is just plain boring.

By early June I’d come up with “Skullkickers” and bought the www.skullkickers.com URL, just in case.

June 13th, 2008:
I pitched Skullkickers via email and, a few hours later, Erik gave us the green light to go ahead with our first arc. I was absolutely blown away. We were two months from the first short story even coming out and we already had an Image series in the pipeline…or so I thought.

On August 12, 2008:
Popgun Volume 2 was released and the Skullkickers make their debut-


Between freelance work that had to take priority and family issues that had come up, Skullkickers #1 art production slowed to a crawl. By October, Chris had roughed out the full issue but only completed 11 pages of pencils. Over the next few months, he sent a few more pages of pencils, eventually getting up to page 15 completed, but it was clear we’d be too slow to make it a regular series so, before the end of the year I told Chris he could let it go. In all honesty, he sounded relieved.

I asked Chris about it recently-
“I’m very proud of my work on Skullkickers and the short stories. I worked hard on all of that and put everything I had into the shorts and concepts. My decision to step away from the comic was entirely financial. I had no way of assuring myself that I was going to make any money and the prospect of doing all that work with no guarantee was too much of a risk for me to take.”


April 8, 2009:
Popgun Volume 3 is released.

At that point, it looked like Skullkickers as a full blown series was dead, but 10 months later, things took an unexpected turn.

February 17, 2010
Edwin Huang reached out to me to send me his latest sequential portfolio after I’d seen his work the previous year. I reply-


Your sequential work is really looking nice. You’ve got some well paced pages and solidly put together sequences.

My only critique would be that the pages work well right now as portfolio pieces but if those same pages had dialogue and sound effects many of them would get pretty cramped and lose their flow. You need to make sure you leave more space for the text required alongside the art. It’s something easy to adjust depending on the amount of dialogue in the scripts you’re working with, but it is worth noting for future reference.

I’ll be totally up front with you. I don’t have any comic work right now at UDON that I could offer you, but I’m impressed with what I see. I may pass the link along to other people I know who are looking for artists.

We start emailing back and forth and I ask Edwin if he’s interested in a concept I’ve had on ice for almost a year.

Edwin checks out Chris’ page art for Skullkickers #1, is understandably impressed, and asks if he can ink the existing pages as practice. Once he finishes those inks, he uses Chris’ roughs as a guide to draw out the rest of the issue. By the time he’s done, I ask him if he’d be interested in taking over the series and he agrees.

By end of February I ask Chris if it’s okay for Edwin to pick up where he left off and Chris gives his blessing for us to go ahead, offering to illustrate covers for the series if it all works out.

March 2, 2010:
I re-pitch Skullkickers to Eric Stephenson, who had since taken over as Publisher at Image, and he gave us the go ahead.

By late March I hire Misty Coats to join us as colorist on the series after her friend Emily Warren recommend her work. Marshall Dillon agrees to continue lettering my creator-owned projects. Finally, we have our creative team locked down and we go into full production.

July 16, 2010:
Skullkickers #1 is listed in the Preview catalog for September release and featured as a ‘Gem of the Month’

July 22-25, 2010:
I’m at San Diego Comic-Con and, when I’m not working at the UDON booth, I hand out Skullkickers postcards trying to drum up more orders for the series.

September 22, 2010:
Our first issue arrives in comic shops and sells out quickly, leading to two more printings of issue #1, and two printings of issue #2 and 3.


Once Skullkickers launches, I start to back fill in the story, incorporating a bunch of my favorite sword & sorcery tropes and building out the world so I can tell funny fantasy yarns without just doing parody. The only thing I didn’t know how to square at first was Baldy’s gun.

Chris had added that in there as a way to mix things up from the typical sword and shield stuff, but now I had a fantasy book with a guy using a shooting iron, which felt more like something out of a western…so I took that to the next logical step and decided Rex was from a western, filling in his origin with Thool and all the cowboy and dimension-hopping stuff. Problem solving led to plot, and that little gun twist would define a lot of the series over the long haul.

Like I said at the start, collaboration is complicated. Ideas grow and change over time and with more input. At each stage of development the project that became Skullkickers could have gone a different direction. I poured a lot of my favorite things into the series, but it really all started with Chris – His artwork, his aesthetic and the weird ideas that made him laugh when we chatted on the phone.

More than a decade later, it’s weird and wonderful looking back at how it all started. I’m so incredibly fortunate to have worked with so many great people on so many amazing projects that have come from releasing Skullkickers. I’m also pumped for our 10th anniversary celebration project called Skullkickers: Caster Bastards and the Great Grotesque.

Ch-Ch-Ch-Changes

14 years.

That’s how long I’ve been coordinating Seneca’s 3-Year Animation Advanced Diploma program.

I’ve been teaching at Seneca for the past 16 years, and 14 of those have included managing curriculum development, student issues, instructor schedules, budget projections, and evaluating portfolios.

Being Coordinator might be the longest and most consistent thing I’ve done in my life. I worked at UDON as an artist and project manager for 9 years. I’ve been freelance comic writing for 11 years. When Stacy and I started dating in 2007 I was already Animation Program Coordinator, so it’s been a constant through our entire relationship and marriage.

Until now.

Juggling both teaching and writing, two full-time careers running in tandem, has been a challenge at times. I’ve earned a few grey hairs thanks to it, but also wouldn’t trade it for anything. The friends I’ve made, projects I’ve been a part of, and places I’ve traveled to, it’s been such an incredible ride.

At the end of last year, we finished our 5-year program review. Animation broke records for applications and portfolios for the fourth year in a row. Our student body is enthusiastic and focused. Our instructors are top notch. Our graduates are working for some of the biggest animation, game, and special effect companies in the world. Seeing all that laid out in black and white in front of me, it felt like a good place to evaluate my own progress as well.

As I looked ahead to 2020 and beyond, I realized how much more would be required, both with the creative projects I have lined up and the expanding needs of one of the college’s most popular and successful programs. Something had to change, otherwise I’d burn out trying to keep doing it all at the same time.

So, I spoke to Mark Jones, a dear friend and Seneca’s Chair of Creative Arts, and requested a professional leave from the college. My professional leave starts late April 2020 and continues through to end of August 2021 – 16 months to focus on my writing and other creative development, working away on some stuff that’s already public along with a couple secret projects I’m excited to see come to life.

When I return after my leave, I won’t be picking back up the Coordinator mantle. After 14 years of building and running the Animation program, it’s time for someone else to take charge. Sean Craig, current Coordinator of our post-grad 3D Animation program and the 3rd year Digital Animation stream, is stepping up to take over. He and I have been discussing this changeover for many months and he has a rock-solid vision for where the program needs to be in the years ahead.

So, that’s the news. After April 22nd, I’ll be focused on writing and other creative endeavors along with expanding my travel schedule so Stacy and I can go places we’ve never been and spend more time in the places we enjoy. I get to see what it’s like to have one crazy creative career instead of two and a half. 

I got into this business (art, animation, comics, games, teaching, all of it) because I love storytelling. Getting to work with so many skilled people who love it as much as I do has been a dream.

What comes next? Keep watching and we’ll find out together as the future unfolds.

Wish me luck,
Jim

Zub Marvel Comics Arriving in November!

BLACK PANTHER AND THE AGENTS OF WAKANDA #3
JIM ZUB (W) • LAN MEDINA (A) • Cover by JORGE MOLINA
VARIANT COVER BY HUMBERTO RAMOS
Black Panther and his hand-picked team are our first line of defense on Earth, in space, or even in other realities. They’re operatives of the unimaginable – They’re Agents of Wakanda.
In this issue – a new mission begins! A disturbing galactic experiment has been waiting, growing…Can the Agents of Wakanda stop its encroaching danger before it’s too late?
Strap on your spacesuits, True Believers! This one’s shootin’ for the moon!
32 PGS./Rated T …$3.99
Arriving 11/13/19

CHAMPIONS BY JIM ZUB VOL. 2 TPB
Written by JIM ZUB
Penciled by STEVEN CUMMINGS
Cover by KIM JACINTO
The future of the Champions hangs in the balance! The War of the Realms is over — but its effect on the Champions has shaken the team to its very core! Meanwhile, Sam Alexander’s mission in space takes an unexpected turn. Will he find redemption — or is this the last ride for the human rocket? Fear, doubt and deception — the Champions’ ideals are about to be tested, and not everyone will make the grade. And as tensions rise, the Freelancers return! But who has betrayed the Champions, and who can they trust? Miles Morales returns — but will it be in time to save his friends? The next generation of heroes made a vow to do better. Now they have to live up to it. Collecting CHAMPIONS (2019) #7-10.
112 PGS./Rated T+ …$15.99
ISBN: 978-1-302-91672-5
Arriving 12/04/19

Champions #8 Reviews

Beyond the Panel: 8.5/10 “It was fun, chaotic, and enlightening for the direction that this team is now taking.”

Black Nerd Problems: 7.5/10 “Cummings does a solid job on the artwork this issue. With a book like Champions, the most important part is nailing everyone’s powers when the action goes down and Cummings excels at that.”

Caped-Joel: “Zub has a lot of fun writing the Freelancers, a group that he did not create, but one that is very synonymous as antagonists for the Champions.”

Chillmonger: “Locust and Power Man were written very well, drawn too.The illustrations by Steven Cummings on every issue he’s done so far are fire.”

Comic Book University: “This was fantastic.”

ComicBook.com: 8/10 “There’s a ton of intrigue surrounding the Champions team at this point, and it gives some of the other characters a great opportunity to shine.”

Monkeys Fighting Robots: 7.8/10 “Champions #8 was a fun issue that resolved and set up plots all in one. It’s always risky when an issue tries to handle both, but when done right it does pay off. And this is one of those times. There wasn’t a dull moment to be had, and fans are left looking forward to seeing what happens next.”

On Comics Ground: 8.6/10 “The art from Steve Cummings & Marcio Menyz remains absolutely slick and wonderfully vivid (with a special note made towards how wonderfully atmospheric the opening and closing pages of the issue are)!”

Weird Science Marvel Comics: 8.3/10 “Sam Alexander gets some hard-earned character development, and the final page alone provides a compelling reason to pick up the next issue. In short, this issue is well worth your time.”

Zub Marvel Comics in August!

MARVEL COMICS #1000
VARIOUS WRITERS • VARIOUS ARTISTS

THE GREATEST TALENT EVER ASSEMBLED FOR ONE STORY!

THIS IS THE BIG ONE! In celebration of Marvel’s 80th Anniversary, we have gathered together the greatest array of talent ever to be assembled between the covers of a single comic book! Names from the past, from the present, and even the future! Every page is filled with all-new work from this cavalcade of comic book luminaries!

There is a mystery that threads throughout the Marvel Universe — one that has its origins in MARVEL COMICS #1 and which unites a disparate array of heroes and villains throughout the decades! What is the Eternity Mask, and who is responsible for the conspiracy to keep it hidden? And what new player will make their startling debut as these secrets are peeled away?
Featuring the entirety of the Marvel Universe of characters!
96 PGS./ONE-SHOT/Rated T …$9.99
PERFECTBOUND FORMAT

CHAMPIONS #8
JIM ZUB (W) • STEVEN CUMMINGS (A)
Cover by KIM JACINTO

• Fear, doubt, and deception…The Champions’ ideals are about to be tested, and not everyone will make the grade.
• Plus, the return of the Freelancers and the fate of Sam Alexander!
32 PGS./Rated T+ …$3.99

TONY STARK: IRON MAN #15
DAN SLOTT & JIM ZUB (W) • VALERIO SCHITI (A) • Cover by Rod Reis
Bring On The Bad Guys Variant Cover by Mark Brooks

Reality is in the eye of the beholder, as Tony Stark questions his humanity… while Jocasta is making the choice to leave her robotic body behind and upgrade to biological parts. A turning point is coming to the Marvel Universe as robotic and A.I. rights are being threatened in America. Guest starring the Vision. And featuring the return of one of the Avengers greatest threats!
32 PGS./Rated T+ …$3.99

SAVAGE SWORD OF CONAN #8
JIM ZUB (W) • PATCH ZIRCHER (A)
Cover by MARCO CHECCHETTO
Variant Cover by LEONARDO MANCO

NEVER DWELL ON THE HAND YOU’RE DEALT – EVEN IF IT’S DEATH!

“CONAN THE GAMBLER” PART 2!
• CONAN’s job as a bodyguard in Shadizar lands him in a deadly game of SERPENT’S BLUFF!
• But if the cards are in Conan’s favor, will this absolve his debt or land him in further danger?
• It’ll take more than luck to win the prize this time!
• PLUS: The next chapter in the all-new CONAN novella “THE SHADOW OF VENGEANCE”!
32 PGS./Parental Advisory …$3.99

The D&D Young Adventurer’s Guides Launch July 16, 2019!

When I was at the Wizards of the Coast office in late 2017 consulting on a new Dungeons & Dragons adventure (a wonderful book that will be announced later this year), we talked a lot about 8-year old Zub and the elements of D&D and role-playing that ignited my imagination at that crucial age. That discussion would come up again a few months later when they introduced me to Aaron Wehner, an editor from Ten Speed Press (an imprint at Random House), and plans started to slowly develop around the kind of book that could engage new players without overwhelming them with game terminologies or rules.

That “D&D Guide” concept struck a chord with all of us who helped brainstorm material on it. We wanted to focus the key elements of what D&D is and show young readers (or new players of any age) the amazing ingredients they could use to create their own characters and heroic stories.

It’s just over a year later and I’m thrilled to announce the first two D&D Young Adventurer’s Guides, MONSTERS & CREATURES and WARRIORS & WEAPONS, arriving from Ten Speed Press! They’re available for pre-order now and will be in bookstores everywhere starting July 16th, 2019!

I’m the architect of the D&D Young Adventurer’s Guides, building the overall structure, writing core sections, and helping art direct the hundreds of brand-new D&D illustrations inside these potent little hardcovers. Working with me to make this series a reality is Stacy King (Manga Classics) and Andrew Wheeler (Freelance, Another Castle), both of whom have been burning the midnight oil researching, writing, and editing the text and art descriptions to make sure each volume is as exciting and engaging as possible. The teams at Ten Speed and Wizards of the Coast have been incredibly supportive, giving us fantastic feedback and advice along the way, and I can’t wait for you to see all this hard work we’ve brought to the page!

I’ve started a Frequently Asked Questions section posted up HERE to give you more information on how the series works and our intended audience.

Expect a lot more details and art teasers as we get closer to launch. Until then, help us spread the word and earmark these books as gifts for friends or family members you’ve been thinking about bringing into the hobby!


D&D Young Adventurer’s Guide 1
Monsters & Creatures

In this illustrated guide, you’re transported to the legendary and magical worlds of Dungeons & Dragons and presented with one-of-a-kind entries for some of its most sinister, foul, and memorable monsters. Featuring amazing illustrations and expert insights on some of D&D’s most dangerous monsters, the guide shines a spotlight on the beasts that scare, excite, and cause trouble for adventurers, from creatures that live underground, to those that dwell in the wilderness and boneyards or soar in the sky.
PRE-ORDER
Amazon
Barnes & Noble
Chapters-Indigo
Hudson Books
Indiebound
Powell’s
Target
Walmart

D&D Young Adventurer’s Guide 2
Warriors & Weapons

In this illustrated guide, you’re transported to the legendary and magical worlds of Dungeons & Dragons, where you are presented with one-of-a-kind entries for different types of warriors, as well as the weaponry these fighters need for D&D adventuring. This guide includes detailed illustrations of the weapons, armor, clothing, and other equipment that fighters use, and offers the tools young, aspiring adventurers need for learning how to build their own characters.
PRE-ORDER
Amazon
Barnes & Noble
Chapters-Indigo
Hudson Books
Indiebound
Powell’s
Target
Walmart

This Weekend: Zub at ICON in Johannesburg

This weekend is the 26th anniversary of the ICON – Comics and Gaming Convention in Johannesburg, South Africa and I will be there! Sean Izaakse (the amazing artist I’ve collaborated with on Pathfinder, Thunderbolts, Uncanny Avengers, and Champions) and I will be at the show signing and sketching for fans.

In addition, I’ll be on several panels throughout the weekend:

Friday, June 29th
Noon-1pm JIM ZUB – LESSONS IN SELF PUBLISHING

Over the past 17 years, Jim Zub has worked on a diverse array of publishing, movie and video game clients. He also juggles his time between being a freelance writer and being a program coordinator for an award-winning animation program for a college in his home town of Toronto.

In this informative and entertaining panel, Jim will take us on his journey from getting his first work in the comic book industry, the lessons in self-publishing game, through to present day where, partnered with Sean Izaakse, Jim is hitting it out of the park with Marvel’s Champions. And, if we’re lucky, Jim may talk about the insane Rick and Morty VS Dungeons & Dragons cross-over!

Saturday, June 30th
10am-11am CHAMPIONS – WITH JIM ZUB & SEAN IZAAKSE

In the aftermath of Civil War II, six adolescent heroes; Ms Marvel (Kamala Khan), Viv Vision, the Totally Awesome Hulk (Amadeus Cho), Nova (Sam Alexander), Spider-Man (Miles Morales), and the time-traveling teen incarnation of Cyclops sought to change the face of superheroics in the Marvel Universe. They did so by forming the Champions, a team dedicated to not just fighting super criminals, but making the world a better place.

Jim Zub and Sean Izaakse took over the creative duties of the Champions title with issue #19, and ushered in a new era that welcomed new members and brought new challenges. Join us as we discuss how the dynamic creative duo brought their own energy and ideas to this hit Marvel series!

2pm-3pm CHARACTER CREATION – FROM AN IDEA TO REALITY
Sean Izaakse and Jim Zub have been credited with taking Marvel’s Champions comic to another level with their fantastic stories and artwork. The two have also worked on creating new characters within the title – and we want to know how they did it!

In this panel, Sean and Jim will take suggestions from the audience and, by the end of the session, come up with a new super hero concept – one that ICON has big plans for over the next year! Come join us for what promises to be an amazing and fun session!

Sunday July 1st
10am-11am JIM ZUB & RAYMOND E. FEIST – VILLAINS!

Often, a story is only as good as the antagonist – a great villain can make or break a story. So what is it that makes a ‘great’ villain? What do writers think about when it comes to avoid key bad guy tropes? How do you make a villain truly special?

Comic book creator Jim Zub and fantasy legend Raymond E. Feist take the stage to discuss what it takes to make a villain truly epic – and answer your questions!